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20121121
20121129
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CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
washington, d.c.. it takes place in cia headquarters, the pentagon, and at the white house. you know, it's funny for me to write a story about a military operation where 90% of the story takes place in washington, d.c., but that's where the story actually unfolded. today, unique, i think, among presidents of the united states, president obama is almost, daily, given a dossier on a target. this is someone in the cross hairs of the cia or the military, and obama or directer petraeus has to make a decision about whether to shoot at that target, whether to take that person out. now, i know that presidents have had to make critically important decisions affecting thousands and hundreds of thousands of lives throughout history of this country, but it seems to me to be a new development for the president of the united states to be deciding on individual targets around the world on a regular basis, and i think that that is probably one of the most unique developments in modern war, and that kind of defines right now the nature of the war that we're fighting. obama, when he said that he was, you kn
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:45am EST
, digital landscape and things like that. the others we have reached out to all regulators, the pentagon, flown to washington, quarterly briefings, you guys need to be in this community. we will open up everything and you don't even know what is possible because it is not my job to regulate, it is not my job to enforce. it is my job to help the regulators do their job better so we feel our responsibility is to bring those entities that we trust protecting our safety, bring them into the process, allow them to see what is possible, stop the bad guys early. we have a deal that if you say something in the community, like here is my drone idea, and go a real long distance, might be a little dangerous, we are like that sounds totally sketchy and we will call off our friend the fbi just like that and we told everybody we would do it and we feel that is our responsibility to let the pros to their job. >> is it time -- [talking over each other] >> robotics, rules would stop robots. it makes everyone bring this up, turns out for a robot to be smart enough to apply the three loss, already taken ov
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 12:45am EST
stuff. the other thing is that we have reached out to all the regulators. the fda, the pentagon, etc. we've actually flown to washington, given briefings, and they say you guys may be in this community and you need to know what's possible. because it's not my job to regulate. it's not my job to enforce it. it's my job to help them do their job better. we feel that our responsibility is to bring those entities that we trust in protecting our safety and bring them into the process and allow them to see what is possible. by the way, we have a deal. if you say something in the community, he said this is my idea and it might be a little dangerous, and we say, that sounds a little sketchy. we told everybody that we are going to do it. and we feel that that is our responsibility. let the pros do their job. >> do you think it's time for robotics? >> the problem is that everybody thinks this up and it turns out that robots have already taken over the world. it's really hard, its artificial intelligence and all this kind of stuff. but that's not the way it's going to happen. we can't imbue our
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 2:00pm EST
, but working in places like the pentagon and headquarter command like central command and working at afghanistan and iraq and other headquarters and there are probably about 2000 or 3000 navy seals. they started in 1962 by president john f. kennedy. the reason why he started it is because what president kennedy wanted to do, he wanted to have dedicated and highly trained forces. those he could put into difficult situations who could not only respond tactically but who can also respond and be thoughtful about working in dangerous situations. his theory that led to the development of this was called a flexible response. the idea was the united states needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner. we needed to be rid able to respond in a flexible manner. that's what led to the development. >> [inaudible question] >> the question was what i care to comment about the latest book on the bin laden rate. you know, i don't think it was a good book to write. i will tell you why. one is that i have tremendous respect for admiral mcraven. he was a four-star navy seal admiral and he took over
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 8:00am EST
-- platoons on the front lines, they're working at places like the pentagon, central command and working in afghanistan and iraq and some of the headquarters, and so there's probably about 2,000 to 3,000 navy seals. they were started on january 1, 1962, by president john f. kennedy. and the reason why he started the seals was he wanted to have a force -- a seal, you may know, stands for sea, air and land commando. and what president kennedy wanted to do was he wanted to have a force of people, a dedicated and high will hi-trained force that -- highly-trained force that he could put in deadly situations who could not only respond tactically, but could also respond and use their minds and be thoughtful about working in some very difficult, dangerous situations. and his theory, the international relations thief ri that led to the development of the sale team was called the flexible response. and the idea was that the united states needed to be able to respond in a flexible manner, not just using nuclear weapons which was kind of the theory at the time. we needed to be able to respond in a f
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 1:00pm EST
, the pentagon told him that the american surveillance plane may have been shot down over cuba. kennedy has the tape recorder rolling and talking to robbie kennedy while the prime minister is -- ambassador is the room. we think a plane has been shut down. what do we do? and he's going through do we do air strikes? he's talking about the things about the prelim performs going to be faced when it comes out. it's one of the remarkable moments you get to hear a.in real time struggling through, okay, now what go do? do we retaliate and send our planes over and knock out the airfield which would have reinflamed the crisis. kennedy was having a reprieve. it was a false alarm. they had scrammed. they hadn't shut down an american plane. you goat windows and you get a sense of the tension what kennedy is facing. had is, you know, a week after the 30 the days. you get a sense how close military action was during the period. >> one thing that comes clear through the years. kennedy was acutely fearful of escalation and how future generations would look if they had lost control of the situation as it
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 7:00pm EST
became quite prominent through vietnam is slow because he a spokesman for the pentagon. get him on record, perhaps he was too tired, i don't know. but he told reporters the government uses information, which everyone knew by self-evident, but no one actually wanted anyone to say. said pentagon spokesman had gone on record in this sparked massive outcry about news management coming to the kennedy administration is manipulating and it's obviously an enduring subject of interest because press leaks in foreign affairs. we need to take a quick break and we'll come back in a moment. >> we were talking about kennedy's news management and relations with the press. one of the fascinating things about your book as they can surprise those looking back at this. think of lyndon johnson's paranoia and angry views of the press during the escalation of vietnam and the press turned against him and with press secretaries who had to do with it. and of course he think of richard nixon and how that led him down as the worst slope to watergate. has he gotten a free ride because he's usually remembered a
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7